Boston Market® Meatloaf

If you already have a recipe that claims to be a clone for this delicious meatloaf...you can now
toss it out, purge if from your hard drive, burn all hard copies.

No clone recipe that I've found yet -- and there are several circulating -- has come even close to the tender, tasty meatloaf you can get from this popular chain. Don't be fooled! To make a REAL clone, first thing you've got to do is use ground sirloin, just as the restaurant chain does. And then you need to know how to make the special sauce that goes into the meatloaf and on top (no it's not ketchup and it's not V8). And there's no minced onion in there (just look at it!), or onion soup mix for that matter. So, search no more for the perfect clone of Boston Market's tasty meatloaf. You've now got the result of days and days of vigorous testing. Even if you don't normally enjoy meatloaf, this one you'll be a cravin'.

In the early 90s Boston Chicken was on a roll. The home meal replacement chain's stock was soaring and the lines were filled with hungry customers waiting to sink their teeth into a serving of the chain's delicious rotisserie chicken. So successful was the chain with chicken, that the company quickly decided it was time to introduce other entrée selections, the first of which was a delicious barbecue sauce-covered ground sirloin meatloaf. But offering the other entrées presented the company with a dilemma: what to do about the name. The bigwigs decided it was time to change the name to Boston Market, to reflect a wider menu. That meant replacing signs on hundreds of units and retooling the marketing campaigns. That name change, plus rapid expansion of the chain and growth of other similar home-style meal concepts sent the company into a tailspin. By 1988, Boston Market's goose was cooked: the company filed for bankruptcy. Soon McDonald's stepped in to purchase the company, with the idea of closing many of the stores for good, and slapping Golden Arches on the rest. But that plan was scrapped when, after selling many of the under-performing Boston Markets, the chain began to fly once again. Within a year of the acquisition Boston Market was profitable, and those meals with the home-cooked taste are still being served at over 700 Boston Market restaurants across the country.

Ingredients:
1 cup tomato sauce
1 1/2 tablespoons Kraft original barbecue sauce
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 1/2 pounds ground sirloin (10 percent fat)
6 tablespoons all-purpose flour
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
dash garlic powder

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

2. Combine the tomato sauce, barbecue sauce, and sugar in
a small saucepan over medium heat. Heat the mixture until
it begins to bubble, stirring often, then remove it from
the heat.

3. In a large bowl, add all but 2 tablespoons of the tomato
sauce to the meat. Use a large wooden spoon or your hands to
work the sauce into the meat until it is very well combined.

4. Combine the remaining ingredients with the groundsirloin - flour, salt, onion powder, ground pepper, and garlic powder. Use the wooden spoon or your hands to work the spices and flour into the meat.

5. Load the meat into a loaf pan (preferably a meatloaf pan with two sections that allows the fat to drain, but if you don't have one of those a regular loaf pan will work). Wrap
foil over the pan and place it into the oven for 30 minutes.

6. After 30 minutes, take the meatloaf from the oven, remove the foil and, if you aren't using a meatloaf pan, drain the fat.

7. Using a knife, slice the meatloaf all the way through into 8 slices while it is still in the pan. This will help to cook the center of the meatloaf. Pour the remaining 2 tablespoons of sauce over the top of the meatloaf, in a stream down the center. Don't spread the sauce.

8. Place the meatloaf back into the oven, uncovered, for 25 - 30 minutes or until it is done.

Remove and allow it to cool for a few minutes before serving.

Serves 4.

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